Vos estis sal terrae (Yup, It’s latin.)
By   |  Culture,  Social,  Strategy 
padre

Last month, I started an internship at Live Content as a Social Media Manager. In the beginning of this adventure I knew very little about the industry. I was introduced to new concepts such as promoted posts, leads, cpc or cpa. I understood what the work of a Social Media Manager was all about, created my Twitter account and became marveled with TweetDeck. I read Seth Godin and Byron Sharp. I discovered the SWOT analysis and was introduced to the meaning of “Ethos, Pathos and Logos”. While I’m aware that (Read more)

Last month, I started an internship at Live Content as a Social Media Manager.

In the beginning of this adventure I knew very little about the industry.

I was introduced to new concepts such as promoted posts, leads, cpc or cpa.

I understood what the work of a Social Media Manager was all about, created my Twitter account and became marveled with TweetDeck.

I read Seth Godin and Byron Sharp.

I discovered the SWOT analysis and was introduced to the meaning of “Ethos, Pathos and Logos”.

While I’m aware that I’m still in the early days of my journey, all this learning and daily analysis of the work that my colleagues were doing, both inside and outside Live Content, made my critical sense blossom.

I realized that for a vast majority of brands and/or clients wandering in this digital universe, Facebook is like Planet Earth. And, as some of them already understood, Agencies are the salt.

With this in mind, I saw how Live Content and other agencies, in comparison, managed their Facebook presences.

No one became a prophet in his own town by repeatedly sharing things like:
– We won this award;
– We closed this deal;
– We made this thing.

By the end of the day, I felt like I was not the only one needing an internship like this.

As Priest Antonio Vieira said, “if the salt has lost his flavor, (…) it is thereafter good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under the feet of men.”

João Belchior

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people ain’t stupid
By   |  Culture,  Social,  Strategy 
beyonce

Now that some time has passed, we can finally agree on one thing: Tidal is the perfect example that people ain’t stupid. Being rich and famous and having a bunch of rich and famous friends isn’t enough. At least these days. Tidal was the perfect opportunity for the rich and famous to stand up for the not so rich and famous. I like to call that empathy. The smart kind. And people like that. Both in other people and brands. After all, Tidal for all. Is it? It’s like if (Read more)

Now that some time has passed, we can finally agree on one thing:

Tidal is the perfect example that people ain’t stupid.

Being rich and famous and having a bunch of rich and famous friends isn’t enough. At least these days.

Tidal was the perfect opportunity for the rich and famous to stand up for the not so rich and famous.

I like to call that empathy. The smart kind.

And people like that. Both in other people and brands.

After all, Tidal for all.

Is it?

It’s like if someone rich and famous told me: “We are now competing with Ferrari and you can have your own Ferrari, too; the one we created for you! And this time, you can afford the gas!”

No, I won’t.

Furthermore, we don’t want high fidelity music. Unless you’re a producer, no one cares about it.

That’s not why we bought walkmans or discmans or mp3 players, in the first place.

We don’t want curated content. We have Facebook and Instagram and Twitter, now, you know?

I can follow Rihanna and her curated content is fine with me.

You’re an artist. Just pay them more.

People ain’t stupid.

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“sorry, amigo” OR you’re not the average consumer
By   |  Social,  Strategy 
helpyouhelpme

Every now and then, there comes an article that makes you think that, MAYBE, you’re not that wrong. That, MAYBE, you should keep on doing what you believe, no matter what. This is one of it: “Imagine for a second that you’re the brand manager for BigSave supermarkets. Your job is to build the BigSave brand so that customers prefer you to SaveMore, and HugeSave. You know how wonderful BigSave is. You want to spread the word. You want consumers to see inside your brand. You want them to know (Read more)

Every now and then, there comes an article that makes you think that, MAYBE, you’re not that wrong. That, MAYBE, you should keep on doing what you believe, no matter what. This is one of it:

“Imagine for a second that you’re the brand manager for BigSave supermarkets.
Your job is to build the BigSave brand so that customers prefer you to SaveMore, and HugeSave.

You know how wonderful BigSave is. You want to spread the word. You want consumers to see inside your brand. You want them to know how responsive you are, and how pleasant you are to engage with, and how willing you are to work with them and help them.

Building the brand is absolutely essential to your career and central to your life. Once you leave the house in the morning, it is the most important thing you do.

Now let’s talk about the average consumer. The average consumer couldn’t give a flying shit about BigSave.

If BigSave exploded tomorrow, the average consumer wouldn’t bother picking up the donuts.

The average consumer has other things on her mind. Like why she gained 2 pounds last week, and why her father is looking pale, and why the fucking computer keeps losing its WiFi signal, and why Timmy’s teacher wants to see her next week, and what’s that bump she noticed on her arm?

The point is this: our brands are very important to us marketers and very unimportant to most consumers. Please read that again.

Are there some brands each of us are attached to? Sure. Are there brands we buy regularly? Sure. Is our attachment to a handful of brands strong and nonsensical? Sure. The problem is we buy stuff in hundreds of categories and are strongly attached to only a few brands.

The idea that our attachment represents “love” or any of the other woolly nonsense perpetrated by brand hustlers is folly.

The clearest demonstration of the weakness of the cult of brands is the dismal performance of social media marketing. We were promised that social media would be the magic carpet on which our legions of brand advocates would go to spread the word about the marvelousness of our brands, and would free us from the terrible, wasteful expense of advertising. It has done nothing of the sort.

In fact, it is often the exact opposite. Social media is usually where people go to scream about the mistreatment we get at the hands of companies. And where companies go to beg forgiveness.

A recent study reported that among a brand’s fans, only .07% — that’s 7 in ten thousand — ever engage with the brand’s Facebook posts. On Twitter the number is even lower — 3 in ten thousand. And these are not average consumers. These are the brands so-called “fans.” (This is a correction from original post which had the number at .7%)

A study I quoted here recently by Havas claims that “in Europe and the US, people would not care if 92% of brands disappeared.”

Having a successful brand is very important to a marketer. But the idea that it is anything like that to a consumer is folly. Brand babble is just the faulty conflation of marketers’ needs and consumers’ interests.

Modern marketing is operating under the delusion that consumers want to interact with brands, and have relationships with brands, and brand experiences, and engage with them, and co-create with them.

Sorry, amigo. Not in this lifetime.”

Originally from: http://adcontrarian.blogspot.com.br/2015/03/what-brand-babblers-dont-understand.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed:+blogspot/lcfIS+%28The+Ad+Contrarian%29


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Planilha Ninja: o melhor jeito para acompanhar o crescimento de seguidores no Instagram!
By   |  Analytics,  Social,  Strategy,  User Experience 
ThumbnailPlanilhaNinja

Já pensou em ter uma planilha automática que lhe fornece dados importantes de crescimento de seguidores no Instagram, de hora em hora? Ela existe, é gratuita e exige apenas algum conhecimento em programação e ferramentas do Google, no caso: Google Apps Script e Google Spreadsheets. O artigo, do publicitário Beto Fraga, é um passo a passo que ensina de forma bem simples como criar a planilha e está disponível aqui: http://bit.ly/19U9Mxp Como podemos ver, o Google Apps Script e o Google Spreadsheets podem ser muito úteis para os mestres das (Read more)

Já pensou em ter uma planilha automática que lhe fornece dados importantes de crescimento de seguidores no Instagram, de hora em hora? Ela existe, é gratuita e exige apenas algum conhecimento em programação e ferramentas do Google, no caso: Google Apps Script e Google Spreadsheets.

O artigo, do publicitário Beto Fraga, é um passo a passo que ensina de forma bem simples como criar a planilha e está disponível aqui: http://bit.ly/19U9Mxp

Como podemos ver, o Google Apps Script e o Google Spreadsheets podem ser muito úteis para os mestres das métricas! Com certeza este não será a última publicação que fazemos sobre o assunto.

Gabriel Justo

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Legalize Facebook
By   |  Culture,  Strategy,  User Experience 
Legalize-It

Everyone is talking about how post​ reach has decreased and how the Facebook guys are being ​ such bastards trying to get some money out of their ​own ​business. People think the lads that work at Facebook pay their bills with likes. Guess what: they don’t. They need to be paid at least to survive another day keeping Facebook running perfectly​ for you​​ and for your business. In the real world, not in ​L​a ​L​a ​L​and, we must​ have​ this in mind: “If you are not paying for it, you’re (Read more)

Everyone is talking about how post​ reach has decreased and how the Facebook guys are being ​ such bastards trying to get some money out of their ​own ​business.

People think the lads that work at Facebook pay their bills with likes. Guess what: they don’t. They need to be paid at least to survive another day keeping Facebook running perfectly​ for you​​ and for your business.

In the real world, not in ​L​a ​L​a ​L​and, we must​ have​ this in mind: “If you are not paying for it, you’re not the customer; you’re the product being sold.” So, people are mad that Facebook has shortened their free audience. How in the world can they do that? How dare you, Mark, try​ to ​get a share of the money I’m making for free on you​r​ platform?

Please, get real, we all live in a capitalist submarine. If Mark and his employees wanted to work ‘pro bono’ they would be U2 roadies instead of building one of the most culturally shaped modern society landscape.

For what I see, Facebook has the perfect business plan. It´s just like one of the most profitable businesses in the world: drug dealing.

At first, they handed it out for free. We were paying out with our data but, hey: our choice, our problem. Let’s deal with it later and rock on while we’re young. After everybody was hooked up on Facebook – brands included – they started asking for money. But they kept giving an extra hit for free. The price was ok for the consumers, no harm was being done, and also none of them were making big money. Then, suddenly, a huge industry where I´m included started to grow around it, and brands began to make big money out of it.

Well, the dealer just raised the prices a bit. The more you buy, the more you’ll get for free. It’s still a good bargain as TV won´t give you free audience. What you pay is what you get. And the segmentation is far too accurate.

Well, this is Facebook’s​ business plan. ​Now l​et’s talk a little more about reach, and the decrease of the organic one. We’re all people behind the screens, right? We know that Facebook’s algorithm tries to give us a better experience, so we remain using it and being sold to brands. They cut down the reach as people were all complaining that there was​ too much publicity. Personally nobody wants to get slammed with ads in their personal place that they believe Facebook is. So, in order to keep us satisfied and answering to a huge boom of Facebook pages from brands, they had to cut it out a bit or people would go elsewhere.

On the other hand, and because we’re all people, Facebook can’t stop one post from being liked and shared. It can reduce the organic reach, it’s true, no doubt about it. But if people like it a lot, if it’s breaking new, it will override the algorithm and get through it anyway.

Some of the brands that I´m responsible for have decreased their organic reach. Some have raised​ it sky high. It depends mainly o​n​ the true organic behavior of people that the Facebook algorithm tries to emulate: content’s organic reach will be equal to the product of its timing, quality, pertinence and affinity with the audience. It will decrease in time, as more things are happening and old news are rubbish. If you look at it, it makes perfect sense. So, good content perfectly timed, that the active community can relate to,​ will always have an outrageous organic result. Don’t panic, it’s still organic.

The problem is that we don´t always match this formula. It’s hard to hit it perfectly 2 times a day, 365 days a year. But it’s not impossible.

Photo: http://bit.ly/1mMBAGy

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