Vos estis sal terrae (Yup, It’s latin.)
By   |  Culture,  Social,  Strategy 
padre

Last month, I started an internship at Live Content as a Social Media Manager. In the beginning of this adventure I knew very little about the industry. I was introduced to new concepts such as promoted posts, leads, cpc or cpa. I understood what the work of a Social Media Manager was all about, created my Twitter account and became marveled with TweetDeck. I read Seth Godin and Byron Sharp. I discovered the SWOT analysis and was introduced to the meaning of “Ethos, Pathos and Logos”. While I’m aware that (Read more)

Last month, I started an internship at Live Content as a Social Media Manager.

In the beginning of this adventure I knew very little about the industry.

I was introduced to new concepts such as promoted posts, leads, cpc or cpa.

I understood what the work of a Social Media Manager was all about, created my Twitter account and became marveled with TweetDeck.

I read Seth Godin and Byron Sharp.

I discovered the SWOT analysis and was introduced to the meaning of “Ethos, Pathos and Logos”.

While I’m aware that I’m still in the early days of my journey, all this learning and daily analysis of the work that my colleagues were doing, both inside and outside Live Content, made my critical sense blossom.

I realized that for a vast majority of brands and/or clients wandering in this digital universe, Facebook is like Planet Earth. And, as some of them already understood, Agencies are the salt.

With this in mind, I saw how Live Content and other agencies, in comparison, managed their Facebook presences.

No one became a prophet in his own town by repeatedly sharing things like:
– We won this award;
– We closed this deal;
– We made this thing.

By the end of the day, I felt like I was not the only one needing an internship like this.

As Priest Antonio Vieira said, “if the salt has lost his flavor, (…) it is thereafter good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under the feet of men.”

João Belchior

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Why not internalize your TV Campaign?
By   |  User Experience 
1

We can discuss the effectiveness of Social Media and Digital Marketing in general. We can argue if there is organic and paid media or if something cialis online pharmacy like Native Advertising is ethical. We know people are online. They check their mobile screens over 100 times a day. They search for gossip cost levitra viagra cialis and communicate over Digital Channels. TV, Twitter and YouTube videos are prime time news material. We fight for attention, traffic and audience. We need design, social media management, creative teams, media planning, CRM (Read more)

We can discuss the effectiveness of Social Media and Digital Marketing in general. We can argue if there is organic and paid media or if something cialis online pharmacy like Native Advertising is ethical. We know people are online. They check their mobile screens over 100 times a day. They search for gossip cost levitra viagra cialis and communicate over Digital Channels. TV, Twitter and YouTube videos are prime time news material. We fight for attention, traffic and audience. We need design, social media management, creative teams, media planning, CRM and project management. Clients, because they use the channel, believed in the idea that they can do it internally. Creating or repositioning people from other jobs. After all is easy: it’s “just posting”. Well, as people use exponentially more viagra vs cialis vs levitra reviews mobile (video online canadian pharmacy reviews 2013 cameras), why not pharmacycanada-rxedtop.com internalize your TV Campaign? Afterall, advertising is still viagra natural advertising.

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Legalize Facebook
By   |  Culture,  Strategy,  User Experience 
Legalize-It

Everyone is talking about how post​ reach has decreased and how the Facebook guys are being ​ such bastards trying to get some money out of their ​own ​business. People think the lads that work at Facebook pay their bills with likes. Guess what: they don’t. They need to be paid at least to survive another day keeping Facebook running perfectly​ for you​​ and for your business. In the real world, not in ​L​a ​L​a ​L​and, we must​ have​ this in mind: “If you are not paying for it, you’re (Read more)

Everyone is talking about how post​ reach has decreased and how the Facebook guys are being ​ such bastards trying to get some money out of their ​own ​business.

People think the lads that work at Facebook pay their bills with likes. Guess what: they don’t. They need to be paid at least to survive another day keeping Facebook running perfectly​ for you​​ and for your business.

In the real world, not in ​L​a ​L​a ​L​and, we must​ have​ this in mind: “If you are not paying for it, you’re not the customer; you’re the product being sold.” So, people are mad that Facebook has shortened their free audience. How in the world can they do that? How dare you, Mark, try​ to ​get a share of the money I’m making for free on you​r​ platform?

Please, get real, we all live in a capitalist submarine. If Mark and his employees wanted to work ‘pro bono’ they would be U2 roadies instead of building one of the most culturally shaped modern society landscape.

For what I see, Facebook has the perfect business plan. It´s just like one of the most profitable businesses in the world: drug dealing.

At first, they handed it out for free. We were paying out with our data but, hey: our choice, our problem. Let’s deal with it later and rock on while we’re young. After everybody was hooked up on Facebook – brands included – they started asking for money. But they kept giving an extra hit for free. The price was ok for the consumers, no harm was being done, and also none of them were making big money. Then, suddenly, a huge industry where I´m included started to grow around it, and brands began to make big money out of it.

Well, the dealer just raised the prices a bit. The more you buy, the more you’ll get for free. It’s still a good bargain as TV won´t give you free audience. What you pay is what you get. And the segmentation is far too accurate.

Well, this is Facebook’s​ business plan. ​Now l​et’s talk a little more about reach, and the decrease of the organic one. We’re all people behind the screens, right? We know that Facebook’s algorithm tries to give us a better experience, so we remain using it and being sold to brands. They cut down the reach as people were all complaining that there was​ too much publicity. Personally nobody wants to get slammed with ads in their personal place that they believe Facebook is. So, in order to keep us satisfied and answering to a huge boom of Facebook pages from brands, they had to cut it out a bit or people would go elsewhere.

On the other hand, and because we’re all people, Facebook can’t stop one post from being liked and shared. It can reduce the organic reach, it’s true, no doubt about it. But if people like it a lot, if it’s breaking new, it will override the algorithm and get through it anyway.

Some of the brands that I´m responsible for have decreased their organic reach. Some have raised​ it sky high. It depends mainly o​n​ the true organic behavior of people that the Facebook algorithm tries to emulate: content’s organic reach will be equal to the product of its timing, quality, pertinence and affinity with the audience. It will decrease in time, as more things are happening and old news are rubbish. If you look at it, it makes perfect sense. So, good content perfectly timed, that the active community can relate to,​ will always have an outrageous organic result. Don’t panic, it’s still organic.

The problem is that we don´t always match this formula. It’s hard to hit it perfectly 2 times a day, 365 days a year. But it’s not impossible.

Photo: http://bit.ly/1mMBAGy

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Close Quarter Combat Social Media (Is there another?)
By   |  User Experience 

Social media is the closest channel that brands have to engage with consumers. Close Quarter Combat is the most effective modern approach to conquer and pacify a community. So what if you try and put two and two together and use it in your favor to build and develop online communities? I’ll point out some of the most important concepts that we can use in order to conquer a community: 1 – Detailed planning If you are designing a strategy for a brand’s digital presence, you’ll have to plan it thoroughly. (Read more)

Social media is the closest channel that brands have to engage with consumers. Close Quarter Combat is the most effective modern approach to conquer and pacify a community.
So what if you try and put two and two together and use it in your favor to build and develop online communities?
I’ll point out some of the most important concepts that we can use in order to conquer a community:

1 – Detailed planning

If you are designing a strategy for a brand’s digital presence, you’ll have to plan it thoroughly. Check out what the enemy is doing and do it better. They have an institutional description in their Facebook page? Beat that. Put your creativity to work and get a kick-ass provocative and humorous statement.

Does the enemy have a nice Twitter? I bet it does, but what about hiding some Easter eggs in the background of yours in a way that only followers with huge screens will see it?

Every detail is important and it´s oriented to a very few, but when you sum up all those small groups you’ll have a community that recognizes the effort that you’ve put in and they´ll appreciate it.

2 – Surprise

People always expect you to follow all the rules and guidelines, all the marketing ‘mumbo-jumbo’ that is written in those shady marketing books about social media, whose writers never had to get their hands dirty working in the real McCoy.

Life is all about surprises. No one likes the conservative guy that will always do the same thing for different brands just because it worked once. You´ll have to risk it. And when I say risk I say put your ass on the line, but do it wisely. Do it for your team: your CM, your designer, your planner and yourself. But don’t do it just to prove a point or just because you’re an egocentric bitch. You´ll get shot right between the eyes.

3 – Methods of entry: dynamic and stealth

Well, this one is easy. In my opinion we should mix these two. In a platform that your enemy has superior firepower (budget and allocated resources) you should lay low and grow in small steps, getting unnoticed by your competition. So when they notice you it’s too late to react.

If you have superior resources, then hit the target with all you got like a superior force of nature: when the enemy gets to see it it’s already too late.

Either way, when in doubt, resort to the first point: detailed planning.

4 – Speed

Move fast as time will always move faster than you. When the platform announces changes you must already have read all about what they are thinking about doing. Cover all possibilities and you’ll never be caught with your pants down.

If the client is picky, design the strategy a couple days before the deadline. Same with reports and new strategies… Do it before it is supposed to and time will run in your favor.

5 – Violence of action

Don´t go halfway. If you’re going to do something there must be no room for hesitation. All your actions must have impact and cause awe and admiration among the enemy soldiers. You don’t just want to win. Just as people say your name, the enemy should run in terror. You want their moral to be low so they can’t fight you back and regain the lost objective ever again.

You go there, you bomb it, you bring the spoils home.

Above all there’s a strategy golden rule that has been passed throughout the years: keep your eyes on the prize. Don’t let it get out of sight for a single second. Be sure to blow those bastards brains out and blow them up in a beautiful fireball.

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How much time does a good joke last?
By   |  Culture,  Social,  Strategy,  User Experience 
joke

How much time does a good joke last? Probably less than a minute. There’s a 2003 hip hop album called “Taste the Secret”, by Ugly Ducking.They created a fake fast food brand called Meatshake (website included) that had the same problems as any other fast food brand – animal cruelty, worker exploitation, etc. That’s a good joke, but it lasts more than an hour. The first half of the album is exciting, the second one is boring as hell. This is the main reason why humour pages are so successful (Read more)

How much time does a good joke last? Probably less than a minute.

There’s a 2003 hip hop album called “Taste the Secret”, by Ugly Ducking.They created a fake fast food brand called Meatshake (website included) that had the same problems as any other fast food brand – animal cruelty, worker exploitation, etc. That’s a good joke, but it lasts more than an hour. The first half of the album is exciting, the second one is boring as hell.

This is the main reason why humour pages are so successful on Facebook & Tumblr. Their jokes don’t last more than 30 seconds to make you laugh (or not). Sorry, but nowadays we don’t have more than those 5 Youtube pre-roll seconds for your brand. So, why the hell are you trying to tell us the story of your whole life?

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