Vos estis sal terrae (Yup, It’s latin.)
By   |  Culture,  Social,  Strategy 
padre

Last month, I started an internship at Live Content as a Social Media Manager. In the beginning of this adventure I knew very little about the industry. I was introduced to new concepts such as promoted posts, leads, cpc or cpa. I understood what the work of a Social Media Manager was all about, created my Twitter account and became marveled with TweetDeck. I read Seth Godin and Byron Sharp. I discovered the SWOT analysis and was introduced to the meaning of “Ethos, Pathos and Logos”. While I’m aware that (Read more)

Last month, I started an internship at Live Content as a Social Media Manager.

In the beginning of this adventure I knew very little about the industry.

I was introduced to new concepts such as promoted posts, leads, cpc or cpa.

I understood what the work of a Social Media Manager was all about, created my Twitter account and became marveled with TweetDeck.

I read Seth Godin and Byron Sharp.

I discovered the SWOT analysis and was introduced to the meaning of “Ethos, Pathos and Logos”.

While I’m aware that I’m still in the early days of my journey, all this learning and daily analysis of the work that my colleagues were doing, both inside and outside Live Content, made my critical sense blossom.

I realized that for a vast majority of brands and/or clients wandering in this digital universe, Facebook is like Planet Earth. And, as some of them already understood, Agencies are the salt.

With this in mind, I saw how Live Content and other agencies, in comparison, managed their Facebook presences.

No one became a prophet in his own town by repeatedly sharing things like:
– We won this award;
– We closed this deal;
– We made this thing.

By the end of the day, I felt like I was not the only one needing an internship like this.

As Priest Antonio Vieira said, “if the salt has lost his flavor, (…) it is thereafter good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under the feet of men.”

João Belchior

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people ain’t stupid
By   |  Culture,  Social,  Strategy 
beyonce

Now that some time has passed, we can finally agree on one thing: Tidal is the perfect example that people ain’t stupid. Being rich and famous and having a bunch of rich and famous friends isn’t enough. At least these days. Tidal was the perfect opportunity for the rich and famous to stand up for the not so rich and famous. I like to call that empathy. The smart kind. And people like that. Both in other people and brands. After all, Tidal for all. Is it? It’s like if (Read more)

Now that some time has passed, we can finally agree on one thing:

Tidal is the perfect example that people ain’t stupid.

Being rich and famous and having a bunch of rich and famous friends isn’t enough. At least these days.

Tidal was the perfect opportunity for the rich and famous to stand up for the not so rich and famous.

I like to call that empathy. The smart kind.

And people like that. Both in other people and brands.

After all, Tidal for all.

Is it?

It’s like if someone rich and famous told me: “We are now competing with Ferrari and you can have your own Ferrari, too; the one we created for you! And this time, you can afford the gas!”

No, I won’t.

Furthermore, we don’t want high fidelity music. Unless you’re a producer, no one cares about it.

That’s not why we bought walkmans or discmans or mp3 players, in the first place.

We don’t want curated content. We have Facebook and Instagram and Twitter, now, you know?

I can follow Rihanna and her curated content is fine with me.

You’re an artist. Just pay them more.

People ain’t stupid.

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who’s the leader of the pack?
By   |  Culture 

After a fairly peculiar and eventful week, I found myself discussing, with one of my coworkers, leadership, judgment, “the right thing to do”, and how to overcome and learn from the usual setbacks of agency work; all in all, the typical thoughts, at the end of the day, of tiredness and (de)motivation. Usually we have a quite similar train of thought and, almost every time, we share the same ideas. However, more often than not, we disagree on how to address the subject, or on which route to take to (Read more)

After a fairly peculiar and eventful week, I found myself discussing, with one of my coworkers, leadership, judgment, “the right thing to do”, and how to overcome and learn from the usual setbacks of agency work; all in all, the typical thoughts, at the end of the day, of tiredness and (de)motivation.

Usually we have a quite similar train of thought and, almost every time, we share the same ideas. However, more often than not, we disagree on how to address the subject, or on which route to take to get us to where we want to. Notwithstanding, and after a good half an hour spent questioning the ‘whys and hows’, the debate ends up focusing on his specific leadership style and on the various others we’ve come across.

And if the subject has always interested me, today it deserves my special attention and care for I too have a team to lead and only God – and many of you – knows what a challenge that is.

In the end, and to sum up, the question and the conclusion are quite simple: are people, in an unrestricted environment, able of act according to their good judgment without ever losing their sense of responsibility, freedom(s) and justice? He believes so. I have my reservations.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m all in favor of a leadership style that empowers each of the team’s members, and allows them to act according to their consciousness and convictions (death to micromanagement!). So much so, that once, I defended tooth and nail the “please, just don’t make me tell you what to do” approach. Today, I can’t look at that statement without acknowledging in it some immaturity.

Curiously, this morning, I picked up a book that was lying on the shelf, gathering dust for half a year, and, without knowing it, it would make me question further about this particular matter right from the very first chapter.

The approach to justice that begins with freedom is a capacious school. In fact, some of the most hard-fought political arguments of our time take place between two rival camps with it – the laissez-faire camp and the fairness camp. Leading the laissez-faire camp are free-market libertarians who believe that justice consists in respecting and upholding the voluntary choices made by consenting adults. The fairness cam contains theorists of a more egalitarian bent. They argue that unfettered markets are neither just nor free. In their view, justice requires policies that remedy social and economic disadvantages and give everyone a fair chance at success.

Justice (2014), Michael J. Sandel

I realized that to speak of leadership is to speak of freedom. And that it’s impossible to speak of freedom without speaking of justice. Although the previous quotation is mainly concerned with the economy and with prosperity, it still raises some important questions and ties up a few loose ends.

Is the laissez-faire model one that allows, especially when things go wrong, for justice and equity in work relationships based on the premise that we are all sensible adults?

Will I always be able to know when I’m crossing the threshold of what’s acceptable in an office argument?

Will I always be able to understand that I must sacrifice for the greater good?

Will I always be able to [insert here any situation in which you doubted your own behavior/decision]?

The agency, in 2015, has no room for authoritarian/imposing types of leadership, and, if you still work in that kind of environment, it’s quite possible that its days are numbered. That’s just not how millennials work.

But, if the freedom and the autonomy required cannot be mistaken for not having any boundaries at all, one question remains. What is (if there is one) the best model to define those boundaries: the intra-definition or the inter-definition?

Do we still require someone one to guide us, or are we able to set our own boundaries within the limits of the pack?

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Adverse Opinions
By   |  User Experience 
youme

Adverse opinions are a pain. Hitler didn’t like them. The Spanish Inquisition didn’t like them either. The Islamic State frowns upon it. Disney didn’t like it when Tim Burton thought he bring “other things” to the table, and neither did one of the might-have-been-a-Beatles-label when they dismissed the guitar as a thing of the past. Adverse opinions are a pain precisely because they are adverse. And, in adversity, we are forced to argue (if we’re the arguing type), to reflection (if we’re the silent type), and to think (if we’re (Read more)

Adverse opinions are a pain. Hitler didn’t like them. The Spanish Inquisition didn’t like them either. The Islamic State frowns upon it.

Disney didn’t like it when Tim Burton thought he bring “other things” to the table, and neither did one of the might-have-been-a-Beatles-label when they dismissed the guitar as a thing of the past.

Adverse opinions are a pain precisely because they are adverse. And, in adversity, we are forced to argue (if we’re the arguing type), to reflection (if we’re the silent type), and to think (if we’re the humane type). Either option requires some effort, and, in most cases, we’d rather stay put in our little corner, or we’d rather defend ourselves, fighting tooth and nail, in joy and in sadness.

Luckily, for me, and for mankind in general, social media allow us that, more than ever. We are all entitled to an opinion, we hoist our flag, with relative ease, in any comment or post (unless you’re a Saudi or a Turk), and words have never had so much power. Freedom of speech, our combined voices, has been the century’s greatest gift.


Unfortunately, for myself, and all of us, stupidity has never run so freely, and the devices behind which we hide never before have allowed us to be so arrogant, petty and judgmental as we are today. And this, it has nothing to do with adverse opinions.

I’ve watched Monica Lewinsky’s TED Talk just this morning. In 1998, this 22 year old girl was about to become the leading star of the “dark side of the web.” In 1998, we took our greatest weapon and, not knowingly, turned it against ourselves.

We are just one step short of being a cyber bully when we forget to argue for the sake of the argument, and just start being judgmental – When we not only do not share, but also ridicule someone else’s opinion (or existence). We instrumentalize social media while we splinter it – we use it to our benefit while we try to annihilate everything social about it.

“Isn’t the same as always, just through a new medium?” Yes. I’d say we’ve moved from the school playground to a bigger one – a bigger, global, perennial and unforgetting playground.

When did our lives become so uninteresting?
Is it the way to empathy that boring?

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“Birdman” and the Oscars® or the expected ignorance of our business
By   |  Culture,  Social,  User Experience 
plastic

On one hand we had a movie made with patience, a lot of patience. It took 12 years to finish Boyhood, an honest movie full of heart and humanity we can all relate to. On the other hand we had an exhibitionist Birdman, a movie with an insipid sequence of 2 hours you can’t relate to, but with a lot of visual skills. This is our world. The best design wins the pitch. Screw strategy and humanity. Guess which one took the biggest prize.

On one hand we had a movie made with patience, a lot of patience. It took 12 years to finish Boyhood, an honest movie full of heart and humanity we can all relate to. On the other hand we had an exhibitionist Birdman, a movie with an insipid sequence of 2 hours you can’t relate to, but with a lot of visual skills. This is our world. The best design wins the pitch. Screw strategy and humanity. Guess which one took the biggest prize.

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